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The DIOP Circle V.16

October 6th, 2019


Path P

Every Sunday, we publish a story from a member of the DIOP community. Because each and every one of you is on a journey and we're right there with you.

This week, we're honored to have Colin Lawton also known as Path P. Our 269th customer, he keeps Kind of Blue on deck. And he's going to share how his art helped him navigate loss.

One of the hardest things I’ve ever had to deal with was the loss of my mother.

When I was a teenager, she was diagnosed with high blood pressure and Diabetes. A bad case of bronchitis led to the development of congestive heart failure. Though her health would improve briefly for a couple of years, she suffered a heart attack while we were on vacation.

I was 20 at the time and it was my first vacation with family since I was a child. We hadn’t even pulled into the station of our destination yet as I held her in my arms.

What was meant to be a joyous time with my immediate family reconnecting with extended family turned to grief instead. Going back home was a great challenge physically and emotionally. For about a good ten years since then, every day felt like heartbreak.

That was when I really learned what depression was. I was always internally sad but I didn’t show it. And because I hid it while always looking to uplift and help friends, few if any really noticed. I suffered in silence. My self-worth was low and my anxiety was high. I regularly became short of breath and endured panic attacks.

Throughout this psychologically tumultuous time, something that always kept me together was art. Photography brought me peace but it quickly became work- something I did for clients. I wanted to be able to create for myself and not a dollar. That’s where music stepped up. Of all the art I’ve practiced since I was little, music became the one that I recognized as something I could really do just for me.

And though it’s a pathway to a career, for me it doesn’t have to be. I think that’s the beauty I’ve found in it. I’ve always loved being an avid music consumer of all genres, but contributing to the art took the experience to another level.

One day, my boy Thre3, a brilliant producer with music in his genes, made this awesome electronic dance beat with some hip hop elements, while we were chilling at his house. It just came over me that I wanted to write to it; he was creating, so I wanted to try my hand at creating in this new way too. I told him how I felt, he threw a notepad at me and said “WRITE.” I crafted my first official verse then and there.

After we recorded it, one of the first things I realized is how important breath control is. I could only record about 4 bars at a time before running out of breath. Though we spent 11 hours working on this one song, it went by like a flash. Another one of our boys from work came through and freestyled some crooning lyrics off the top of his head. With that, we had our first rough recording of a full song.

From there, the seed was planted and it become a growing love. I couldn’t shake it; this was my true peace. 6 years later, in 2014, Thre3 and I released our first official studio album together, LifeInTheRealestHue.

To this day, I find it to be a timeless project that gave me an opportunity to lay my emotions out on the table. It was a gateway to relieving and healing a lot of the pain I had felt since losing my mother, losing friends, failed relationships, unemployment, everything under the sun that felt like it was all spiraling out of control at one point or another.

If you’re going through something, don’t be afraid to talk to someone, especially a trusted individual or group. In hindsight, I know now that my relationships suffered because I was battling with my sense of self. A necessary step to healing is finding a way to express how you feel, safely and responsibly.

Art was my therapy. Therapy could be someone’s therapy. Whatever that may be for you, there’s power in the courage and vulnerability to share what’s going on. Trust your craft. The only competition is who you were yesterday.

7 projects, including 3 award-winning albums and 4 singles later, I’ve learned that my newfound love for making authentic, vulnerable, and motivational music isn’t just cathartic for me, but for others too.

Furthermore, it became part of the process for cultivating a greater version of myself; A truly empowered, invigorated, abundant person that I had long awaited to meet. He’s here now, and ain’t goin’ nowhere.


The DIOP Circle V.16

October 6th, 2019


Path P

Every Sunday, we publish a story from a member of the DIOP community. Because each and every one of you is on a journey and we're right there with you.

This week, we're honored to have Colin Lawton also known as Path P. Our 269th customer, he keeps Kind of Blue on deck. And he's going to share how his art helped him navigate loss.

One of the hardest things I’ve ever had to deal with was the loss of my mother.

When I was a teenager, she was diagnosed with high blood pressure and Diabetes. A bad case of bronchitis led to the development of congestive heart failure. Though her health would improve briefly for a couple of years, she suffered a heart attack while we were on vacation. I was 20 at the time and it was my first vacation with family since I was a child. We hadn’t even pulled into the station of our destination yet as I held her in my arms.

What was meant to be a joyous time with my immediate family reconnecting with extended family turned to grief instead. Going back home was a great challenge physically and emotionally. For about a good ten years since then, every day felt like heartbreak.

That was when I really learned what depression was. I was always internally sad but I didn’t show it. And because I hid it while always looking to uplift and help friends, few if any really noticed. I suffered in silence. My self-worth was low and my anxiety was high. I regularly became short of breath and endured panic attacks.

Throughout this psychologically tumultuous time, something that always kept me together was art. Photography brought me peace but it quickly became work- something I did for clients. I wanted to be able to create for myself and not a dollar. That’s where music stepped up. Of all the art I’ve practiced since I was little, music became the one that I recognized as something I could really do just for me.

And though it’s a pathway to a career, for me it doesn’t have to be. I think that’s the beauty I’ve found in it. I’ve always loved being an avid music consumer of all genres, but contributing to the art took the experience to another level.

One day, my boy Thre3, a brilliant producer with music in his genes, made this awesome electronic dance beat with some hip hop elements, while we were chilling at his house. It just came over me that I wanted to write to it; he was creating, so I wanted to try my hand at creating in this new way too. I told him how I felt, he threw a notepad at me and said “WRITE.” I crafted my first official verse then and there.

After we recorded it, one of the first things I realized is how important breath control is. I could only record about 4 bars at a time before running out of breath. Though we spent 11 hours working on this one song, it went by like a flash. Another one of our boys from work came through and freestyled some crooning lyrics off the top of his head. With that, we had our first rough recording of a full song.

From there, the seed was planted and it become a growing love. I couldn’t shake it; this was my true peace. 6 years later, in 2014, Thre3 and I released our first official studio album together, LifeInTheRealestHue.

To this day, I find it to be a timeless project that gave me an opportunity to lay my emotions out on the table. It was a gateway to relieving and healing a lot of the pain I had felt since losing my mother, losing friends, failed relationships, unemployment, everything under the sun that felt like it was all spiraling out of control at one point or another.

If you’re going through something, don’t be afraid to talk to someone, especially a trusted individual or group. In hindsight, I know now that my relationships suffered because I was battling with my sense of self. A necessary step to healing is finding a way to express how you feel, safely and responsibly.

Art was my therapy. Therapy could be someone’s therapy. Whatever that may be for you, there’s power in the courage and vulnerability to share what’s going on. Trust your craft. The only competition is who you were yesterday.

7 projects, including 3 award-winning albums and 4 singles later, I’ve learned that my newfound love for making authentic, vulnerable, and motivational music isn’t just cathartic for me, but for others too. Furthermore, it became part of the process for cultivating a greater version of myself; A truly empowered, invigorated, abundant person that I had long awaited to meet. He’s here now, and ain’t goin’ nowhere.


By Colin Lawton (a.k.a. Path P)

Follow Colin @pathpmusic. His new album “Revolution & Legacy, Vol. II: The Legacy” is available now on all major streaming platforms.

The views and opinions expressed here are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of DIOP.


- Colin Lawton (a.k.a. Path P)


Follow Colin @pathpmusic. His new album “Revolution & Legacy, Vol. II: The Legacy” is available now on all major streaming platforms.

The views and opinions expressed here are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of DIOP.