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The DIOP Circle V.21

November 10th, 2019


Cole Ford

Every Sunday, we publish a story from a member of the DIOP community. Because each and every one of you is on a journey and we're right there with you.

This week, we're pleased to share the wisdom of Cole Ford. One of our most frequent customers, he doesn't believe in choosing favorites. Visit our story to see how love pushes him to make the most of each and every day.

When I was 4 years old, I got up in the middle of a Catholic Church service and walked across the street to a Quaker Meeting House. In that meeting house, I found a loving, tight- knit community. Many of them were farmers in their 70s and 80s. This being New Hampshire, they were the originators of the green movement, helping to pass local laws about mandatory recycling as early as 1968.

As I learned more about their spiritual practice, especially self-sufficiency, and how it tied into our local history, I saw a space for myself and became a member at the age of 5.

As a kid, I loved being in the kitchen. My Grandmother, who had mastered most French techniques, was an avid baker and amazing chef. In addition to cookbooks, she had hundreds of index cards with different recipes. She taught me everything. By the fifth grade, I began to learn the history of food and researched different cooking techniques.

For high school, I studied in a vocational culinary program. I also worked in a restaurant open to the public and helped out a family friend’s catering business. Because of all the hands-on experience, I felt I didn’t need to go to culinary school. I tried corporate jobs as a change of pace but then a job opened up at a local Thai restaurant where I grew up. And I was right back in kitchens.

Food connects us. It bridges gaps between time and space. What’s on someone’s plate represents these connections, part of what makes food an inescapable part of culture. Food really helped me open up to different kinds of creative exploration. Just like I need my food, I want my art to be organic and sustainable.

I began to explore my local arts scene about twelve years ago. I’d go to scene release parties and became attracted to people on my creative wavelength. I took part in a Wire Magazine challenge to make an album in a month. It really took a hold of where I was at mentally. And I began to record more music on my own.

As my career progressed, I was able to focus and refine my skill set. I got opportunities in the culinary world that allowed to me not just support artists but push them to commit to their work when they weren’t sure. Beginning with four multimedia pieces, I’m starting to collect more art. I really want to invest in the future.

There’s lots of visual art that isn't sustainable just as there is a lot of food that isn't sustainable. The most meaningful art to me is natural, just like food. By natural, I mean undeniable. It doesn’t need to be too deep because its value is naturally evident. I don't look for art as much as I try to feel it.

I’m very interested in connecting with more progressive people interested in making change. I’ve invested in sustainably sourced, fair trade jewelry. KGBLTD works with miners, gemologists, and silversmiths around the world to make accessories safely and at fair value.

If there’s one piece of advice, no matter who you are, love i what we need to do more. Love of self and passing it on through everything you do. As simple as it may seem, it’s beyond powerful to let it envelope you, there’s nothing you can’t accomplish. Love more. It worked for me and continues to do so every day. And I wouldn’t be having this conversation if it didn’t.


The DIOP Circle V.21

November 10th, 2019


Cole Ford

Every Sunday, we publish a story from a member of the DIOP community. Because each and every one of you is on a journey and we're right there with you.

This week, we're pleased to share the wisdom of Cole Ford. One of our most frequent customers, he doesn't believe in choosing favorites. Visit our story to see how love pushes him to make the most of each and every day.

When I was 4 years old, I got up in the middle of a Catholic Church service and walked across the street to a Quaker Meeting House. In that meeting house, I found a loving, tight- knit community. Many of them were farmers in their 70s and 80s. This being New Hampshire, they were the originators of the green movement, helping to pass local laws about mandatory recycling as early as 1968.

As I learned more about their spiritual practice, especially self-sufficiency, and how it tied into our local history, I saw a space for myself and became a member at the age of 5.

As a kid, I loved being in the kitchen. My Grandmother, who had mastered most French techniques, was an avid baker and amazing chef. In addition to cookbooks, she had hundreds of index cards with different recipes. She taught me everything. By the fifth grade, I began to learn the history of food and researched different cooking techniques.

For high school, I studied in a vocational culinary program. I also worked in a restaurant open to the public and helped out a family friend’s catering business. Because of all the hands-on experience, I felt I didn’t need to go to culinary school. I tried corporate jobs as a change of pace but then a job opened up at a local Thai restaurant where I grew up. And I was right back in kitchens.

Food connects us. It bridges gaps between time and space. What’s on someone’s plate represents these connections, part of what makes food an inescapable part of culture. Food really helped me open up to different kinds of creative exploration. Just like I need my food, I want my art to be organic and sustainable.

I began to explore my local arts scene about twelve years ago. I’d go to scene release parties and became attracted to people on my creative wavelength. I took part in a Wire Magazine challenge to make an album in a month. It really took a hold of where I was at mentally. And I began to record more music on my own.

As my career progressed, I was able to focus and refine my skill set. I got opportunities in the culinary world that allowed to me not just support artists but push them to commit to their work when they weren’t sure. Beginning with four multimedia pieces, I’m starting to collect more art. I really want to invest in the future.

There’s lots of visual art that isn't sustainable just as there is a lot of food that isn't sustainable. The most meaningful art to me is natural, just like food. By natural, I mean undeniable. It doesn’t need to be too deep because its value is naturally evident. I don't look for art as much as I try to feel it.

I’m very interested in connecting with more progressive people interested in making change. I’ve invested in sustainably sourced, fair trade jewelry. KGBLTD works with miners, gemologists, and silversmiths around the world to make accessories safely and at fair value.

If there’s one piece of advice, no matter who you are, love i what we need to do more. Love of self and passing it on through everything you do. As simple as it may seem, it’s beyond powerful to let it envelope you, there’s nothing you can’t accomplish. Love more. It worked for me and continues to do so every day. And I wouldn’t be having this conversation if it didn’t.


By Cole Ford

Follow Cole @coleconradford.

The views and opinions expressed here are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of DIOP.


- Cole Ford


Follow Travis @coleconradford.

The views and opinions expressed here are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of DIOP.