The DIOP Circle V.40

May 17th, 2020


Bryce Moore

Every Sunday, we publish a story from a member of the DIOP community. Because each and every one of you is on a journey and we're right there with you.

This week, we're delighted to present Bryce Moore. Our 83rd customer, Bryce always keeps his Desperado (!!) bandana close by. And he's going to share how he turns wisdom into poetry.

I wasn’t a poet, nor did I see myself as one.

That’s because I didn’t really have a relationship with poetry when I was younger. However, I began as a director of theater at my church when I was 16 years old. Everyone else in the department was older. There were certainly no other teenagers. Just earning the respect of the elders was a challenge but that was how I grew as an artist. The ability to start with an idea and take it into production, overseeing its consistent phases and taking a step back when necessary to evaluate as objectively as possible. Not only did I become a better person because of how intimately I came to know my collaborators, but I wondered, as we used the scripts of others, if I could write my own.

After writing five or six scripts myself, I began a playwriting class my junior year of high school. For me, it dovetailed well with joining the speech and debate club. I had a passion for not only the written word but was falling in love with spoken word. Often, I’d have to get up and speak in front of people and I wanted to do it myself.

My senior year I took a creative writing class. It was a very general survey class covering a wide range of topics and genres, including poetry and prose, fiction and nonfiction. Though my first poems were rough, I wanted to get my writing out there. I created an Instagram account separate from my personal one and I would post quotes that would come to me. I found that people would really connect with them and it inspired me to really try again to write poems.

Finding a routine was initially tough. There were times I knew I wasn’t in a creative mindset. I tried to force myself to write, but I wasn’t proud of those poems. And if I’m not proud of it, I won’t put it out. I need to let the inspiration flow. My creative process varies with each poem. It really does depend on what it is. Some say to write every day, but I know that doesn’t work for me. But I do know I have to be moved in order to write. If it isn’t moving, it’s not worth writing about.

For example, today I was inspired by a podcast. As the host spoke, a couple of different words came to me and I jotted them down. When I return to them, I might use them in a poem along with other words and phrases that come out of conversations, research, and observations I make walking along a street. Words come to me and round out into ideas. When I sit down, I try and write a poem or two a week.

I’m currently in my senior year of college. And as I look forward, I’d like to publish a book at some point. I’m leaning towards pursuing an MFA in Creative Writing. I think a graduate program will allow me the education, knowledge, and connections to not just push myself creatively but help make things better.

My least favorite thing about the process is starting or ending. When you start out, you struggle with the ideas you have, especially what kind of form the poem will take and how it will close out. I don’t think about spacing or title until after it’s written because it’s one of the hardest things to determine. Space can communicate things words cannot.

My grandfather was a lifelong smoker and he passed away from cancer related to tobacco use. It really inspired me to get involved in activism, particularly around anti-tobacco education. I joined a youth led state organization called the Truth Initiative, whose goal was to travel and educate young people about tobacco products. It was one of the best experiences I could have. I was fortunate to be named the Campaign For Tobacco Free Kids Advocate of the Year. I still work with both organizations now, training other young people and attending rallies. What I love to do is fight for a cause.

If I have any wisdom to share, it is to stand in your truth. Never run from it. It can be easy to acknowledge and then avoid. But you must figure out how you want to best move through this world. Because, ultimately all you are left with is yourself. Being a gay queer man in Mississippi, I always circle back to my own experience. It informs and shapes the lens through which I view poetry and the world. It is really important that each and every person knows their truth and finds a way to live it. No one else can do it for you so why not?


The DIOP Circle V.40

May 17th, 2020


Bryce Moore

Every Sunday, we publish a story from a member of the DIOP community. Because each and every one of you is on a journey and we're right there with you.

This week, we're delighted to present Bryce Moore. Our 83rd customer, Bryce always keeps his Desperado (!!) bandana close by. And he's going to share how he turns wisdom into poetry.

I wasn’t a poet, nor did I see myself as one.

That’s because I didn’t really have a relationship with poetry when I was younger. However, I began as a director of theater at my church when I was 16 years old. Everyone else in the department was older. There were certainly no other teenagers. Just earning the respect of the elders was a challenge but that was how I grew as an artist. The ability to start with an idea and take it into production, overseeing its consistent phases and taking a step back when necessary to evaluate as objectively as possible. Not only did I become a better person because of how intimately I came to know my collaborators, but I wondered, as we used the scripts of others, if I could write my own.

After writing five or six scripts myself, I began a playwriting class my junior year of high school. For me, it dovetailed well with joining the speech and debate club. I had a passion for not only the written word but was falling in love with spoken word. Often, I’d have to get up and speak in front of people and I wanted to do it myself.

My senior year I took a creative writing class. It was a very general survey class covering a wide range of topics and genres, including poetry and prose, fiction and nonfiction. Though my first poems were rough, I wanted to get my writing out there. I created an Instagram account separate from my personal one and I would post quotes that would come to me. I found that people would really connect with them and it inspired me to really try again to write poems.

Finding a routine was initially tough. There were times I knew I wasn’t in a creative mindset. I tried to force myself to write, but I wasn’t proud of those poems. And if I’m not proud of it, I won’t put it out. I need to let the inspiration flow. My creative process varies with each poem. It really does depend on what it is. Some say to write every day, but I know that doesn’t work for me. But I do know I have to be moved in order to write. If it isn’t moving, it’s not worth writing about.

For example, today I was inspired by a podcast. As the host spoke, a couple of different words came to me and I jotted them down. When I return to them, I might use them in a poem along with other words and phrases that come out of conversations, research, and observations I make walking along a street. Words come to me and round out into ideas. When I sit down, I try and write a poem or two a week.

I’m currently in my senior year of college. And as I look forward, I’d like to publish a book at some point. I’m leaning towards pursuing an MFA in Creative Writing. I think a graduate program will allow me the education, knowledge, and connections to not just push myself creatively but help make things better.

My least favorite thing about the process is starting or ending. When you start out, you struggle with the ideas you have, especially what kind of form the poem will take and how it will close out. I don’t think about spacing or title until after it’s written because it’s one of the hardest things to determine. Space can communicate things words cannot.

My grandfather was a lifelong smoker and he passed away from cancer related to tobacco use. It really inspired me to get involved in activism, particularly around anti-tobacco education. I joined a youth led state organization called the Truth Initiative, whose goal was to travel and educate young people about tobacco products. It was one of the best experiences I could have. I was fortunate to be named the Campaign For Tobacco Free Kids Advocate of the Year. I still work with both organizations now, training other young people and attending rallies. What I love to do is fight for a cause.

If I have any wisdom to share, it is to stand in your truth. Never run from it. It can be easy to acknowledge and then avoid. But you must figure out how you want to best move through this world. Because, ultimately all you are left with is yourself. Being a gay queer man in Mississippi, I always circle back to my own experience. It informs and shapes the lens through which I view poetry and the world. It is really important that each and every person knows their truth and finds a way to live it. No one else can do it for you so why not?


Bryce Moore

Follow Bryce Moore @thebrycemoore and @therebelpoet_

The views and opinions expressed here are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of DIOP.


- Bryce Moore


Follow Bryce Moore @thebrycemoore and @therebelpoet_

The views and opinions expressed here are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of DIOP.